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Archive for November, 2013

Get Your Creepy Caffeine On At These Cemetery Cafes

Life, like a 24-pack of French bread pizza, is bound to run out sooner or later. When that happens, our bodies are usually shuffled to the nearest cemetery for a spot of the old eternal slumber. Now you can gaze upon these slumberers as you eat tasty treats. What fun!

Cemetery cafes have been popping up all over Berlin lately. It’s a bona-fide trend. Café Strauss, for instance, overlooks a set of headstones and family tombs. Plus, they serve a mighty fine Turkish coffee. These cafes have attracted not only curious tourists and onlookers, but also the families and friends of the recently deceased.

There is no word if this trend will ever make it outside of Germany, but I’ll let you know if it does. In the meantime, you can always drink your coffee while watching cemetery scenes from movies.

Leftover White Turkey Chili

In our humble opinion, Thanksgiving is superior to any other day of the year. In an effort to make this year’s feast the best of all time (sorry, Pilgrims and Wampanoag tribe), we’re bringing you the recipes, how-tos and decorating ideas to help you become a Turkey Day pro.

My very first batch of white turkey chili involved tossing a bunch of ingredients into a pot and praying for the best. Much to my surprise, my family was scraping the bottom of the pot within an hour (and not because I didn’t make enough!). Now, leftover-turkey chili is as much a part of our Thanksgiving tradition as the holiday meal itself.

One of the things I love most about this recipe is that it never turns out exactly the same. If I’m feeling particularly lazy, I’ll swap canned chiles for fresh, and sometimes — if I want to get adventurous — I’ll toss in a few “exotic” peppers from the nearby Mexican market. This plan can backfire, however, if you don’t know what you’re doing (I didn’t), so make sure you sample the peppers before it’s too late. (Thankfully, a few cups of cooked white rice salvaged the pot and silenced the alarms, not to mention it tasted amazing.)

Play around with ingredient quantities and flavors to make it your own. Hominy and even white potatoes make tasty additions to this soup. I prefer my turkey chili to be thick and creamier than most. Some recipes call for adding cornmeal or pureeing some of the beans with an immersion blender, but I find that a basic roux with some milk (or heavy cream) does the trick.

The best thing about this dish, and chili in general, is that it just keeps getting better as the days go by. I suggest making it early in the morning, then turning off the range and letting it be. Now sit back, relax and savor your new day-after-Thanksgiving tradition.

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Finally, You Will Soon Be Able to Taste the Internet

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Here at the Cooking Channel we pride ourselves on being an easy and fun way for you to learn how to whip up delicious grub. However, there has always been that bland, tasteless elephant in the room of televised cooking programming. You can’t taste the food. No matter how good a lasagna looks on TV, it’s still just a lonely image being projected via a satellite that nobody can ever, ever chomp down on. Never say ever, ever.

Scientists at the University of Singapore are working on something called the Digital Taste Interface. This amazing gadget could quite literally let you taste through the screen, using the magic of electrodes and thermal manipulation to pull a fast one on your taste buds. All food, at their core, are just a combination of sweet, salty, sour and bitter (and, sure, sometimes umami.) This device arranges these flavor components to match a particular dish.

But what is that you say? Food is nothing without the wafting aroma that goes with it? True, but they are working on that as well. The goal is to be able to faithfully recreate the tasting experience, only in front of your computer and television.

How to Turn Thanksgiving Leftovers into Scones, Chowder, Sorbet and More

In our humble opinion, Thanksgiving is superior to any other day of the year. In an effort to make this year’s feast the best of all time (sorry, Pilgrims and Wampanoag tribe), we’re bringing you the recipes, how-tos and decorating ideas to help you become a Turkey Day pro.

So it’s the day after Thanksgiving and, like many Americans, you have tons of leftovers: leftover stuffing, leftover sides and, of course, plenty of leftover turkey. Turkeys are big birds, after all, and people tend to forego poultry seconds in favor of the many sides and sweets.

Whether you hosted Thanksgiving dinner and have several containers of leftovers in your fridge, or were a guest gifted some turkey and sides by a gracious host, there’s got to be a better way to prepare the remnants of Turkey Day than popping them in the microwave.

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Thirsty Thursday: Thanksgiving’s a Breeze Seabreezes

In our humble opinion, Thanksgiving is superior to any other day of the year. In an effort to make this year’s feast the best of all time (sorry, Pilgrims and Wampanoag tribe), we’re bringing you the recipes, how-tos and decorating ideas to help you become a Turkey Day pro.


It’s more than just alliteration; it’s a statement, a proclamation that Thursdays are when the weekend should really start. Kicking it off right is the key, and what better way than with a cocktail that not only takes the edge off, but tastes good too. A hard thing to disagree with, we know. Drink up, get down and go to sleep happy.

Warning: we do not recommend drinking while carving. And while we definitely want to avoid the potentially hazardous situation of carving a turkey under the influence, we also think that everyone could use a drink on the morning of Thanksgiving to curb some of that holiday stress.

Think of this cocktail as an autumnal screwdriver (vodka + orange juice) with the addition of cranberry juice and fresh mint. This Seabreeze is the perfect morning beverage to wake you up to start that bird early on Thanksgiving.

Happy Thanksgiving, folks!

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Get 25 things to make with leftovers.

Hump Day Snack: Turkey Pinata Cake

In our humble opinion, Thanksgiving is superior to any other day of the year. In an effort to make this year’s feast the best of all time (sorry, Pilgrims and Wampanoag tribe), we’re bringing you the recipes, how-tos and decorating ideas to help you become a Turkey Day pro.

Who says turkey can’t be served for dessert? If you truly believe that, you’re not thinking big enough this Thanksgiving. To appropriately wow your dinner guests, pull out all the stops and make this “roasted” turkey cake, complete with sweet stuffing and a sugary surprise lurking deep inside. Sure this project requires three boxes of cake mix, but all that baking will be worth it when you slice into the frosted bird to reveal a colorful candy corn center. Don’t worry, the center cut of cake doesn’t go to waste either, as it’s repurposed into toasted, cocoa-dusted cubes of stuffing that spill out of the turkey like the real thing. If all this attention to detail still doesn’t satisfy your inner perfectionist, break out the fondant and roll some faux vegetables for artfully placing around your winged work of art. Finally, sit back, relax and let the compliments roll in, because you just won the Thanksgiving dessert round.

Get the details for recreating this enticing turkey cake yourself, and then get baking with more of Cooking Channel’s most impressive Thanksgiving cake recipes:

Tokyo Cafe Offers Tasty Treats and Calming Naps

The act of eating our weight in food sure is fun. Afterwards, though? Not so fun. There is the requisite shame, self loathing and promise never to eat again. There is also pure, unadulterated sleepiness. The fatigue gets so bad that you could fall asleep right at your table. You can’t do that though, right? Don’t be so sure, sleepyhead.

Tokyo now plays home to a place called The Nap Cafe Corne, named as such because it allows patrons to take naps after eating. Each customer gets their own private area to nosh and nap. The cafe offers sandwiches and snacks for the chomp and curtains, beds and pillows for the snooze. It’s a perfect set up.

This perfect set up, however, is for ladies only. Boys aren’t allowed at this nap cafe. Us guys will have to do it the old fashioned way, by inhaling a triple cheeseburger combo meal and passing out in a used Dodge Dart.

Pickled Cranberries: Not Your Grandmother’s Cranberry Sauce

In our humble opinion, Thanksgiving is superior to any other day of the year. In an effort to make this year’s feast the best of all time (sorry, Pilgrims and Wampanoag tribe), we’re bringing you the recipes, how-tos and decorating ideas to help you become a Turkey Day pro.


There are a few things you don’t talk about at the holiday table lest you risk the conversation turning sour. Religion. Politics. And whether jellied or chunky cranberry sauce is better. Seriously, it could come to fisticuffs. But to that I say: to heck with the sauce. This year, pickle your crans for a side that is surprising and delicious — and will surely mollify both sides of this intractable debate.

Now, when I first mentioned this idea, an Internet friend squawked: “Pickled cranberries? What will you pickle next, sorrel?” Allow me to alleviate your fears. We’re not talking kosher dills here. Think more bread-and-butter pickles, with a sweet brine that tempers and complements the cranberries’ natural pucker. Small-batch canner extraordinaire Marisa McClellan of Food in Jars first put forth this concept. Like most pickling projects, it’s easy as can be. The only thing to consider is to make them far enough ahead of time for the flavors to mellow and round out. A couple days will do, so there’s still plenty of time for Turkey Day.

As a bonus prize, your leftover brine will be a cranberry shrub, or drinking vinegar. Serve one part of the shrub mixed in four to five parts sparkling water for a bright, refreshing beverage that makes a lovely alternative to wine for your non-drinking guests.

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Dinner Rush! Linguine with Roasted Broccoli and Walnuts

I find few things in life to be as transformational as roasted broccoli. That’s right, I said it: transformational.

I’ve always been a big fan of the green machine (especially in the presence of cheese sauce, but that’s a recipe for another time). It has served me well in many a Chinese takeout container and is simply superb in a cream soup.

It’s not until you roast it, though, that your eyes are finally opened wide and you realize just what you’ve been missing. Deeply caramelizing the tender ends of a broccoli floret not only makes them crunch a little when bitten into, it awakens a hearty, almost meaty flavor that otherwise lies dormant in one of America’s favorite go-to vegetables. Word to the wise: Don’t rush the roasted broccoli. The deeper and darker it caramelizes, the more payoff you’ll have at the dinner table.

Try it alongside toasted walnuts and a balsamic glaze that harmonizes so well you’ll be salivating for the next Meatless Monday.

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