Watch Cooking Channel

Beat the Wheat: Gluten-Free Granola Muffins

Gluten-Free Granola Muffins
AKA My Baby Takes the Mornin’ Train 

When you have celiac, it can be difficult to find food on the go that’s safe to eat for any meal during the day. In the morning I am a major bigtime crankypants, and I want something delicious to snack on (and also to absorb the insane amount of coffee I drink, if I’m being totally honest). So I need something delicious and substantive and, most important, easy and quick.

Dumping a bag of granola into my mouth while driving was not exactly working out (too many raisins found their way into my bra). So I decided muffins were the way to go and created a gluten-free granola muffin recipe that is pretty easy to tinker with, depending on what you like in your granola.

Continue Reading Beat the Wheat: Gluten-Free Granola Muffins

Guy Wins Science by Inventing Levitating Cocktail Machine

Remember Charlie Francis? Founder of the Lick Me I’m Delicious ice cream company, he is perhaps better known for inventing glow in the dark ice cream. Well, his propensity for unnecessary inventions didn’t stop there. Francis is back with his latest creation, a cocktail machine that that creates floating drinks.

He calls it the Levitron. It uses obscenely potent sound waves to levitate droplets of alcohol and mixer in the air. Francis and his partner, Bristol University Professor Bruce Drinkwater, have used the machine to create levitating gin and tonic at 70 percent proof and levitating Bloody Mary cocktail at 160 percent proof. The drinks have to be incredibly potent to account for the fact that if they feature too much liquid they will no longer be able to float.

Just how potent are these drinks? Francis says an average-sized human could get drunk on as little as four drops.

Fall Fest: Eat As Much Pumpkin as Possible

Bright orange and already popping up on porches across the country, the pumpkin is the most infamous fall signifier. Beyond its decor potential, this member of the squash family is also a bit magical (just ask Cinderella or check out The Legend of Sleepy Hollow). Of all the lore, we’re partial to Peter Peter Pumpkin Eater for his diet and all it’s gourd-infused potential. Tempted to try it? Here are the five ways to start.

1. These pumpkin-packed sticky buns (pictured above) are practically guaranteed to improve any autumn morning. The gooey pastry is topped with a sweet pecan-bourbon caramel sauce for an extra indulgent coating.

Continue Reading Fall Fest: Eat As Much Pumpkin as Possible

This Native American Restaurant Serves ‘Pre-Colonization’ Menu

There aren’t exactly many Native American restaurants in this country, which is kind of a bummer. As a matter of fact, New York City boasts exactly zero. Minneapolis, however, will soon house one. Even cooler? Fortunately, the creator promises the entire menu will come from the days before colonization. Unfortunately, that means no pizza.

The eatery, which will be named The Sioux Chef, is set to feature the area’s only Native American menu. The items on order here will be the real deal, as in actual meals that were prepared many, many moons ago. This means stuff like Wojapi soup — which is made from duck and dandelion — and stewed rabbit with fiddlehead fern. Many of the dishes are inherently familiar and exotic at the same time. In other words, it’ll probably be delicious.

The chef behind The Sioux Chef, Sean Sherman, plans on having the restaurant open in a couple of months. In the meantime, he is playing his trade by catering events in the area.

Hump Day Snack: Kabocha Squash Ice Cream with Maple Pecans

Tired of hearing about pumpkin-flavored everything? Then go for a slightly less popular gourd that is just as tasty and versatile. Instead of serving it savory, transform creamy kabocha squash into Kabocha Ice Cream with Maple Toasted Pecans. The golden ice cream has a velveteen texture and flavor of ginger-infused coconut milk, nutmeg, cinnamon and maple syrup. Swirl in simple homemade cranberry sauce and three-ingredient maple-toasted pecans to add tartness and crunch. Then scoop it into waffle cones for an all-star autumn dessert — no pumpkin or pie-making necessary!

Find out more uses for the season’s squash and gourds with these recipes from Cooking Channel:

New Varieties of Apples

Macintosh, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith… these apple varieties are old standbys, but as new apple varietals and old heirlooms get more popular, you’ll find yourself wanting to explore. Learn more about some of these other varieties — what they’re like and how to use them.

Newer apple hybrids: A lot of the newer apple hybrid varieties being developed are mostly right for eating out of hand—they’re crisp and juicy, sweet and a bit tart. Look for these on grocery shelves and markets near you:

Continue Reading New Varieties of Apples

Will Fried Leaves Be the Newest Fall Food Trend?

Do you feel that gentle lilt in the air? Fall is upon us, forcing us to take those light sweaters out of the closet. As an added bonus, the season also brings fallen leaves in every color of the rainbow. These leaves are pretty to look at, but why stop there? Let’s put ‘em in a big bowl and eat ‘em! That’s what the residents of one Japanese town do.

Minoo City, in the province of Osaka, has a signature dish: a bowl of deep-fried leaves! Local chefs take the Japanese maple leaf, known in Japan as momiji, and plate it up as a crunchy bowl of tempura. Momiji tempura is so popular, as a matter of fact, that it has made the town something of a destination spot for tourists.

These aren’t leaves taken from the ground and thrown in a random fryer, however. They are salted in barrels for a year before being battered and fried. According to locals, the recipe goes back 1,000 years. Who knew the front yard was filled with potential for culinary delights?

Dinner Rush! Pork Chops with Pierogi and Seared Apples

Ready yourself for impact because that magical time of year when apples manage to sneak their way into every corner of your autumnally themed life is now. Just try and look away as their dappled red and green skins flood quaint little baskets at farmers markets. Resist the smell of freshly fried cider doughnuts? Impossible. You might as well just surrender as “25 new ways to cook with apples” overtakes your Pinterest feed.

Speaking of which, here’s a delicious dinner recipe to try using apples.

Continue Reading Dinner Rush! Pork Chops with Pierogi and Seared Apples

Sifted: Cider-Salted Caramel, Oktoberfest Beer Bread, Kale Salad + More

Kale Salad with Sauteed Apples

Hot Links We’re Loving:

  • You may have been proud of your apple-picking loot at the farm, but if you ran out of ways to use the bounty after baking a crisp and a pie, try serving the fruit in this Kale Salad with Sauteed Apples from Brooklyn Supper.
  • Even in the name of Octoberfest, guzzling pint after pint can be taxing (and beer-belly-inducing). Take your brew differently  and arguably more responsibly  with Spiced Octoberfest Beer Bread by Savory Simple.

Craving More?

Behind the Wine: It’s Harvest Season in Oregon

vineyard

October is an exciting month in the agriculture world, as peaches and corn give way to apples and pumpkins, prime for the picking. And in certain vine-filled valleys, it’s a lush time, indeed: the grape harvest. On a recent visit to Willamette Valley — Oregon’s up-and-coming wine region known for its bold Pinot Noirs and crisp Chardonnays — we learned that an unusually warm summer had sped up the growing and ripening process, resulting in an earlier harvest. Lucky for us, that meant we were able to get up close and personal with those big, juicy grapes.

To learn all about the harvest process — and see how varying microclimates within a 10-mile radius can yield entirely different grapes — we visited a few different wineries. We checked in with Winemaker Melissa Burr from Stoller Family Estate as she sampled some of the new juices coming off of the vines, and toured Sokol Blosser and Penner-Ash wineries to see how their harvests were progressing.

Continue Reading Behind the Wine: It’s Harvest Season in Oregon

c