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Posts Tagged ‘Chinese Recipes’

Party in Five: DIY Dim Sum Party


We here at Cooking Channel love a good party. But throwing a memorable event requires more than just gathering some food and drinks. We show you how, with just five main “ingredients” (including recipes, big-impact decorating ideas and easy DIY elements), you can throw a party that feels like it has a cohesive theme — minimal work required.

Dinner parties can be a lot of work, but when you invite guests to get involved with the preparation of the meal, you can significantly reduce your party prep time (and stress). I recently hosted a Dim Sum party and welcomed a few friends into the kitchen to learn how to make Chinese dumplings. The interactive entree was the perfect focal point of a festive dinner full of modern, eye-catching Asian-inspired details. And since guests spent the evening socializing in the kitchen, I didn’t have to miss out on a single moment.

To host your own Dim Sum party, you’ll need five essential ingredients:

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Happy Chinese New Year! and Congrats on Not Being Eaten Alive

Chinese New Year Recipes

Ever wonder who came up with the idea that “everybody’s Irish” on St. Patrick’s Day? Whoever it was, I think most of America owes them a huge thank you, or at least a shot of Jameson. But why stop there? Isn’t it time we open ourselves up to the traditions and cuisines of other cultures — especially when the cuisine is insanely delicious? Today is Chinese New Year and it’s the perfect opportunity for everyone to “be Chinese” for a day.

Tonight at 8pm ET on Ching’s Chinese New Year, host Ching-He Huang will share her “blueprint” for a fun and fortuitous Chinese New Year celebration, giving you the inside scoop on decorations, firecrackers and a mouthwatering Chinese feast that’s sure to bring you good luck in the year of the snake. Now, if you live in a city like San Francisco or New York, chances are you’re somewhat familiar with the loud and colorful festivities of Chinese New Year. (It’s hard to miss a huge red dragon marching down Main Street.) But why all the flare, you ask? It’s a holiday steeped in tradition and superstition, and it all begins with one fantastic legend. Gather around children; it’s story time:

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iLL Fortune Cookies Make Confucius Sound Like a Moron

Ill Fortune Cookies

Ever wonder who writes the “fortunes” you find inside the fortune cookies you get at the end of a Chinese takeout meal? I put “fortunes” in quotes because a lot of the time they aren’t really fortunes that predict the future, but merely presumptuous statements about your life — or just really obscure proverbs from legendary Chinese wise man Confucius. Usually on the back there’s a vocabulary word so you can learn Chinese in piecemeal — not that you ever remember the word anyway — followed by some lucky numbers — not that Confucius was alive to even know how big a Mega Millions lottery can get. If he had known, he might have kept those numbers to himself.

But never mind about that ancient Chinese guy. Now there’s iLL Fortune Cookies, a new type of post-Chinese food treat, because “we live in the ‘real’ world” — as stated on the box (which, of course, looks like a big Chinese takeout container). Created by the iLLFortune company based in the California Bay Area, these “fortune cookies for the brave” look and taste like ordinary fortune cookies, but inside are snarky and sarcastic sayings designed to prank your friends — or your enemies. Like ordinary fortune cookies, they don’t always predict the future, but rather state an assumption about your life — in an intentionally insulting way.

Some iLL Fortunes I’ve opened up include:

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Chinese New Year: Recipes for the Year of the Dragon

There are many traditions and superstitions surrounding the Chinese New Year, which Steamy Kitchen’s Jaden Hair outlined for us, but as we enter the year of the Dragon, we at Cooking Channel are most excited about the holiday’s fifteen days of feasting. (Naturally.) This year, the Chinese New Year falls on Monday, January 23.

Steering clear of squid (eating the tentacled creatures during the celebration symbolizes getting fired in the coming year), we’ve rounded up some of our best Chinese recipes for your at-home celebration:

Wok-Cooked Monkfish with Sesame Soy Sauce
Cooking a fish whole — including head and tail — symbolizes togetherness and unity. Enjoy this dish on New Year’s Eve and then partake in the leftovers the next day to gurantee having more than enough food in the coming year.

Zesty Chile Tiger Prawns
Forecast a year filled with happiness and laughter with this delicious garlic and chile-flavored shrimp dish.

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