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Posts Tagged ‘Fancy Fast Food’

Fancy Super Bowl Snacks Made with Convenience Store Ingredients

So the big game is finally upon us, and you, like many other people in this country of football (the American kind, that is), are out to watch it in style — on television, in the comfort of your favorite bar or living room. And as everyone knows, it’s not just about gathering around a flat screen with a couple of brewskis to make the game more exciting, it’s also about the snacks that are served and consumed, in a great American tradition on par with Thanksgiving.

Let’s say that, for whatever reason, you’ve found yourself playing last-minute host for a Super Bowl party, and you don’t have time to do a big supermarket run. Have no fear. All you need to do is hit your closest gas station convenience store — where we bought all the ingredients for these Super Bowl snack recipes, which are as tasty as they are convenient. Just be sure to make a lot of them; they might be gone before the first commercial break.

Check out 10 Super Bowl Snacks Made with Food You Can Buy at a Gas Station

Erik Trinidad is a food and travel writer, and the author of the cookbook parody Fancy Fast Food: Ironic Recipes with No Bun Intended, based off his popular food humor blog.

How to Turn Thanksgiving Leftovers into Scones, Chowder, Sorbet and More

In our humble opinion, Thanksgiving is superior to any other day of the year. In an effort to make this year’s feast the best of all time (sorry, Pilgrims and Wampanoag tribe), we’re bringing you the recipes, how-tos and decorating ideas to help you become a Turkey Day pro.

So it’s the day after Thanksgiving and, like many Americans, you have tons of leftovers: leftover stuffing, leftover sides and, of course, plenty of leftover turkey. Turkeys are big birds, after all, and people tend to forego poultry seconds in favor of the many sides and sweets.

Whether you hosted Thanksgiving dinner and have several containers of leftovers in your fridge, or were a guest gifted some turkey and sides by a gracious host, there’s got to be a better way to prepare the remnants of Turkey Day than popping them in the microwave.

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Candy Corn Oreos

Oreos, those cookies that have been around for a century — they just celebrated their 100th birthday this year — are an icon in the food world, or rather, they’re an icon in the bigger scheme of things. That’s because when you’re the world’s top-selling cookie, you have the clout to be more than just a sweet treat. The Oreo brand may have originally been known around the world for its creme-filled chocolate cookie sandwiches — in fact, it has become the generonym for any cookie like it — but it’s become much more than that. Oreos are a part of culture, and their public support of gay rights early this year — and the subsequent praise and backlash of it — has shown that Oreos aren’t just cookies. They’re cookies with influence.

With that said, Nabisco, creator of Oreos, can pretty much do whatever it wants with the prized cookies, and over the years, it has; Oreos come in different iterations of the classic recipe, from Double Stuf to Mini Oreos, but it’s not just about size. The standard formula has been tweaked for specific markets — for example, in Japan there’s green tea-flavored creme filling — and now, for the upcoming Halloween holiday, there are candy corn-flavored Oreos.

Obviously, it’s always a buzzworthy thing when the standard Oreo comes in a new version, even if it is for just a limited time. Candy Corn Oreos are only available for the next several weeks, to capitalize on Halloween hype.

But are they worth their own hype?

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Tasting Vodka with Your Nose (A Review)


Unless you’re from the country of Moldova (or know someone from there), chances are you don’t know exactly where it is on a map. This Eastern European nation lies tucked between Romania and Ukraine, where its picturesque countryside attracts visitors who come for its bucolic vibe — those who actually know its geographic location, that is. While many may know Moldova for its wine, this former Soviet republic also produces vodka, a remnant of being under Russian rule for almost two centuries. And Moldovan vodka (or “vodca,” as they spell it) is ready to introduce its creators’ country to America, one cocktail at a time.

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What It’s Like to Eat a Plate of Garbage (A Review)

Get Your Fill with the Garbage Plate

Most American college towns have their go-to late-night eatery perfect for ultra-greasy food after a night of boozing, and Rochester, N.Y., home of the University of Rochester, is no exception. Whether they’re in college or not, most locals know that if you really want to get your fill of greasy food cheaply, you should eat a Garbage Plate: a plate of greasy home fries and macaroni salad, topped with your choice of fried ham, fish, chicken, sausage, eggs, grilled cheese, hamburger or hot dogs (known regionally merely as “hots”). All of this is topped with a signature “hot sauce,” which isn’t spicy at all (just like a hot dog isn’t spicy, either) — it’s ground meat, minced onions and other seasonings.

There are many restaurants in the Rochester region that sell these piles of food, and most are called “trash plates,” “dumpster plates” or “hot plates” because “Garbage Plate” was trademarked by its originator: Nick Tahou, a Greek immigrant who created it during the Great Depression as an offering of a large amount of food at an affordable price. Fast-forward about eight decades and the Garbage Plate (originally known as “Hots and Potatoes”) is still around today, feeding the masses of drunken college kids, or anyone who wants a cheap and nostalgic calorie overdose.

Continue Reading What It’s Like to Eat a Plate of Garbage (A Review)

Can King Oscar’s Canned Fish Have Sex Appeal? (A Review)

Confession: As a child, I always assumed tuna was a little fish because it came in little cans. I never imagined the 3-footer marine creatures that they actually are. But it’s no secret that some little fish do come in cans — in this case, sardines — for there are plenty of fish in the sea (just not all are suited to be served in metal containers).

To some people, canned fish may have a bit of stigma attached to it — the can automatically denotes that the fish is not fresh. But for others, it’s a completely normal and delicious way to transport seafood, especially when you don’t live near a coast. In fact in inland Spain, canned seafood, or latillas as they are called (literally “little cans”), is very much part of the gastronomic culture in the home and in tapas bars.

Continue Reading Can King Oscar’s Canned Fish Have Sex Appeal? (A Review)

Gourmet Spam Can Make You Think Twice About the Pork Product

Love it or hate it, Spam is here to stay — although you’re definitely in the majority if you really don’t care for it. For years, mainstream opinion has denounced the canned pork product, so much that its very name has been used as the slang term for undesirable email that you can’t avoid and just want to drag into the trash.

Spam, a product of Hormel Foods, is almost synonymous with “processed food,” yet with its unnaturally rectangular shape, it’s a product so peculiar that it has become sort of a cult food item. In many developing nations, particularly in the Pacific, Spam is a part of the culinary culture — a remnant of the days of American military bases that required cheap canned meat. I myself am Filipino-American and grew up with Spam, and I quite enjoyed it for breakfast. So I wasn’t too shy about trying a house-cured gourmet version of it.

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