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25 Ways to Use Matzo

Have you already run out of Passover-friendly meals and never want to see another piece of brisket again? (Okay, maybe just one more slice). To help you avoid the Passover food rut and the twice-a-day matzo pizza, we’ve gathered recipes to fill your 8 days of unleavened bread. Because you can really only eat so much matzo ball soup before becoming an actual matzo ball.

  1. Matzo Brei is a mix between French toast and scrambled eggs in the best sort of way. You can go sweet and add some cinnamon and sugar while you scramble, or go savory with Matzo Brei with Creamed Spinach and Crispy Onions.
  2. Up the ante in the search for the afikomen, a game played during the Passover Seder, by hiding Chocolate Coconut Matzo Bark (pictured above) instead of a plain piece of matzo.
  3. Matzo meal, finely crushed pieces of matzo, is a game-changer during Passover. Although pretty bland on its own, matzo meal is the base for delicious dishes like Matzo Apple Tea Cakes.
  4. Matzo farfel is a Passover-friendly egg pasta dough (often sold pre-made) that is mainly used in kugel, soups and side dishes, but it can also be used to make Chocolate Matzo Farfel Haystacks, an easy sweet treat.
  5. These ain’t your grandmas’ matzo ball soup recipes: Bobby Flay adds flair to Throwdown’s Matzo Ball Soup with the addition of jalapenos. You can also go the mushroom route with Truffled, Shiitake Matzo Ball Soup and gribenes, the kosher version of pork rinds. Alternatively, Sephardic Chicken Soup with Sofrito and Herbed Matzo Balls give matzo balls a saffron makeover.

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Behind the Scenes: The Making of Matzo

Manischewitz makes 1 million sheets of matzo per day during Passover season and almost 75 million sheets annually. That’s a lot of matzo. We visited the plant and headquarters in Newark, N.J., to go behind the scenes of a production that, during its peak season, has its team making matzo 20 hours a day. To be certified kosher for Passover, the matzo production follows very strict guidelines and abides by kosher laws. We donned hairnets for a behind-the-scenes factory tour to see how this unleavened bread, a Passover staple, is made.

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Making the Most Out of Matzo

Ah, Passover. Though only eight days, the Jewish holiday that forbids flour feels much longer — especially to food lovers. Dry, crumbly matzo — the flat, unleavened bread eaten throughout the holiday — leaves much to be desired (and often prompts dreams of dancing bagels and pizza pies). But when mixed with surprising ingredients, standard-issue Passover fare becomes…dare we say…delicious?

Matzo ball soup (shown above) is a classic dish consumed at Jewish holidays year-round, but the delicate, fluffy balls aren’t easy to perfect. Far too often our soups are saddled down with dense rocks that’d be better fit as paperweights. Mix earthy, moisture-retaining shiitake mushrooms and fragrant truffle oil into your balls and we guarantee a soup that blows your grandmother’s out of the bowl.

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Chocolate Matzo Brittle

Matzo Brittle may forever change the way I feel about matzo.

I was asked to bring a dessert to my family’s Passover Seder this year. This presented a bit of a conundrum: All use of flour and leavening agents is forbidden on Passover, so needless to say, the baked goods on the holiday table often leave something to be desired. I also needed something that I could make ahead and transport easily on the train from New York to Washington D.C.

Rather than attempting a batch of flourless cookies that go uneaten every year, I decided to embrace the dry, cracker-like, mostly flavorless bread of the holiday and make chocolate matzo brittle. I usually can’t stomach much matzo, but certainly I could improve it by smothering it with molten sugar, chocolate and nuts?

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